Margarine vs. butter vs. olive oil vs. coconut oil…

“Like butter, margarine is about 80% fat, 20% water and solids, flavored, colored, and fortified with vitamin A, and sometimes D, to match butter’s nutritional contribution to the human diet.” – Wikipedia

I’m not a chemist (and you have to be one to figure out margarine), but there’s something wrong with this picture.  The government, and all their little pawns from top to bottom infiltrating our communities, are choosing margarine as the healthy option, Low in Cholesterol! Yay!  Why color it, flavor it, and fortify it with Vitamins?   Not only that, but more and more studies are showing that you can still have low cholesterol, and still be at high risk for CardioVascular disease.

“A new national study has shown that nearly 75 percent of patients hospitalized for a heart attack had cholesterol levels that would indicate they were not at high risk for a cardiovascular event, based on current national cholesterol guidelines.”UCLA

Harvard School of Public Health is on the right track. “The Nurses’ Health Study found that women who ate 4 teaspoons of stick margarine a day had a 50 percent greater risk of heart disease than women who ate margarine only rarely.” (21)

https://i2.wp.com/medicalimages.allrefer.com/large/margarine-vs-butter.jpg

Websites like allreferhealth.com show you how to be healthy…because eating margarine on a bagel is good for you.   No wonder you can’t lose weight, you’re always craving more food that has absolutely no nutritional value, you can’t get enough sleep, and you don’t have enough energy to stay awake at work…ugh.

Although we have these statistics, there’s still ALL KINDS OF CONFUSION about what to do with them. Harvard suggests, less red meat and more beans & less whole milk and more low-fat milk (didn’t they just disspell that fat makes you fat?), and eat more liquid vegetable oil than margarine.  Good Grief.

This is what you do.  Eat meat, vegetables, nuts and seeds, and some fruit.  When you cook, use Olive Oil (liquid) for low temps and coconut oil (solid) for high temps because it creates minimal byproducts when heating.

Choosing Olive Oil:

  • Extra-virgin olive oil comes from virgin oil production only, contains no more than 0.8% acidity, and is judged to have a superior taste. Extra Virgin olive oil accounts for less than 10% of oil in many producing countries; the percentage is far higher in the Mediterranean countries (Greece: 80%, Italy: 45%, Spain 30%). It is used on salads, added at the table to soups and stews and for dipping.
  • Virgin olive oil comes from virgin oil production only, has an acidity less than 2%, and is judged to have a good taste.
  • Pure olive oil. Oils labeled as Pure olive oil or Olive oil are usually a blend of refined and virgin production oil.
  • Olive oil is a blend of virgin and refined production oil, of no more than 1.5% acidity. It commonly lacks a strong flavor.

The following may be found in olive oil labels:

  • “Pure Olive Oil” or just “Olive Oil” is often the lowest quality available in a retail store: better grades would have “virgin” on the label.
  • “Made from refined olive oils” means that the taste and acidity were chemically controlled.
  • Cold pressed means “that the oil was not heated over a certain temperature (usually 80 degrees Fahrenheit) during processing, thus retaining more nutrients and undergoing less degradation.”[36]
  • First cold pressed means “that the fruit of the olive was crushed exactly one time-i.e., the first press. The cold refers to the temperature range of the fruit at the time it is crushed.”[37] In Calabria (Italy) the olives are collected in October. In regions like Tuscany or Liguria, the olives collected in November and ground often at night are too cold to be processed efficiently without heating. The paste is regularly heated above the environmental temperatures, which may be as low as 10-15 °C, to extract the oil efficiently with only physical means. Olives pressed in warm regions like Southern Italy or Northern Africa may be pressed at significantly higher temperatures although not heated. While it is important that the pressing temperatures be as low as possible (generally below 35 °C) there is no international reliable definition of “cold pressed”. – Wikipedia
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About hcfchallenge

The Paleo diet is simple yet remarkably effective for fat loss and halting or preventing a number of degenerative diseases. To reap the benefits of the most effective nutritional strategy known, one need simply build meals from the following: * Lean proteins (ideally) grass fed meat, free range fowl and wild caught fish * Seasonal fruits and vegetables * Healthy fats such as nuts, seeds, avocado, olive oil, and coconut oil Our 6 week challenge will help you ease your way into the Paleo Diet. Regardless of your fitness or health goals, you WILL look, feel and perform your best on the Paleo diet. For most people the fact the Paleo diet delivers the best results is enough. Improved blood lipids, weight loss and reduced pain from autoimmunity is proof enough. Many people however are not satisfied with blindly following any recommendations, be they nutrition or exercise related. Some folks like to know WHY they are doing something. Fortunately, the Paleo diet has stood not only the test of time, but also the rigors of scientific scrutiny. View all posts by hcfchallenge

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